A# Dorian

A# Dorian scale for guitar.
The A sharp Dorian is a seven-note scale. Colored circles in the diagram mark the notes, with darker color highlighting the root notes. In the two-octave pattern, the first root note is on the 6th string, 6th fret.

A# Dorian 2 octaves

A# Dorian scale diagram

A# Dorian full fretboard

A# Dorian scale whole guitar neck diagram

A# Dorian note names

A# Dorian scale with note letters diagram
Notes: A# - B# - C# - D# - E# - F## - G# Intervals: 2 - 1 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 1 - 2 Type: Septonic 

The scale displayed with its numeric formula, intervals and scale degrees.

Formula Notes Intervals Degrees
1 A# Unison Tonic
2 B# Major second Supertonic
b3 C# Minor third Mediant
4 D# Perfect fourth Subdominant
5 E# Perfect fifth Dominant
6 F## Sixth Submediant
b7 G# Minor seventh Subtonic

The second degree is written as B#, which is the same as C. The fifth degree is written as E#, which is the same as F. The sixth degree is written as F##, which is the same as G. A practice in a scale notation is to not include the same letter twice, if it can be avoided.

The A sharp Dorian scale consists of seven notes. These can be described as steps on the guitar fingerboard according to the following formula: whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half and whole from the first note to the same in the next octave.
The A sharp Dorian is the second mode of the G# Major Scale. It contains exactly the same notes, but starts on another note. Since Dorian has a Minor scale quality it can also be seen as a mode of the F Minor.
The scale is otherwise most related to the A# Natural Minor and A# Melodic Minor scales, which differ with just one note in both cases.

This scale is typically played over a minor seventh chord (primarily A#m7 in this case) and is used in styles such as jazz and blues. It is sometimes called A sharp Jazz Minor (although it shouldn't be confused with the Melodic Minor, which also is associated as a minor jazz scale).
One way to learn this scale is to observe the minor 7th chord shapes that it is built around. For example, the A#m7 barre chord with the root on the 6th string within the scale in 6th position. Another way is to think of it as the A# Minor scale with a raised sixth.

Chords that are related to this scale are the following:

A#m7, A#m9, A#m11
Cm7
C#maj7, C#maj9
D#7, D#9, D#11, D#13
Fm7, Fm9, Fm11
Gm7b5
G#maj7, G#maj9, G#maj13

The tones in these chords correspond to the tones of the A# Dorian scale (triads have been excluded).

Related to this scale are Dorian b2 and Dorian #4, being the 2nd mode of the Melodic Minor and the 4th mode of the Harmonic Minor.

The A# Dorian b2 scale, also known as A# Phrygian #6 scale, is identical with the A# Dorian except for the minor second. It can be displayed as follows:

Formula Notes Intervals Degrees
1 A# Unison Tonic
b2 B Minor second Supertonic
b3 C# Minor third Mediant
4 D# Perfect fourth Subdominant
5 E# Perfect fifth Dominant
6 F## Sixth Submediant
b7 G# Minor seventh Subtonic

The A# Dorian b2 contains the same notes as the G# Melodic Minor Scale, but starts on another note.

The A# Dorian #4 scale is identical with the A# Dorian except for the augmented fourth. It can be displayed as follows:

Formula Notes Intervals Degrees
1 A# Unison Tonic
2 B# Major second Supertonic
b3 C# Minor third Mediant
#4 D## Augmented fourth Subdominant
5 E# Perfect fifth Dominant
6 F## Sixth Submediant
b7 G# Minor seventh Subtonic

The A# Dorian #4 contains the same notes as the F Harmonic Minor Scale, but starts on another note.

Start the audio and play along! Use notes from the scale in the diagram above.

Normal tempo:
Slow tempo: